click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121128
20121206
STATION
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 3
CNNW 2
FBC 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
of inequality. that is why it is a civil rights issue. those people need choices, but it will have an effect on the individual child and more kids will be better educated and it will have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say that as well. [applause] >> i would only add standards to that. i think it's important that we as a society, said very clear expectations for what it is. michael is a secretary of state, not in the sense that condoleezza rice was, but as a member of the cabinet there. the secretary of state and the united foundation for education. >> it has been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it is worth traveling across the united states. >> the ultimate compliment. >> the first time i have ever worried about you judging. [laughter] >> he made the point that national security, one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that they recognize it as a moral complex more than anything. and america realizes that they couldn't win these nations in particular. it was a precondition of winning across the globe. if you'll forgive me, but it's the same danger now. the e
of inequality. that's why it's called a civil rights issue. they need choices. it will have them an effect on the individual child more kids will be better educate and ting will have a effect on the -- so i would say -- [inaudible] [applause] >> i would only add standards. i think it's important as we as a society set expectations for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- not sense that cobbed lee -- condoleezza rice was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation
it happen, but in the civil rights era, for example, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibusters done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights legislation were opposed by republicans just as they were by notary -- non-southern departments, and civil rights legislation, overcoming filibusters being enacted was at least as much to the credibility of the senate minority leader as to lyndon johnson so what we've seen now is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party as fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues with the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near unanimously, and keep in mind on no , nomins where holds, which are notices that you will deny unanimous concept, and in some instances have been filibust
intensely about it, where will put everything on the line to make it happen. in the civil rights era, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibuster's done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights in a deflation were opposed by republicans, just as they were by non- southern democrats. the fact is that civil rights and legislation and overcoming this filibuster's and being enacted which at least as much to the credit and responsibility of everett dirksen, the minority leader, as to lyndon johnson. what we have seen is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool, and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party has fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues where the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near it unanimously. keep in mind on nominations, where holds w
's life is threatened by this legislation. joining him is fellow civil rights carrie kennedy. the center awarded frank for his efforts in uganda. good to have you here. you've been fighting this bill for years. david cato who is a friend of yours, recently killed in uganda for his work against fighting this bill. you've taken over his work. but are you basically handing yourself a death sentence by being on a program like this putting yourself in a line of fire? >> yes. i've been fighting this legislation for a long time now and if this legislation is passed into law, i will definitely be put life in prison or life -- or sentenced to death. and right knew, i'm here in new york with the human rights and have been providing a lot of support in trying to stop this legislation. the speaker says she wants to pass it as a christmas gift for ugandans. >> it is the pipeline, moved through a certain lower form of government there working up for a vote within parliament. carrie, why does the rfk center want to highlight a sister like frank and what is taking place in uganda? in america we're celeb
to negotiate. we passed the civil rights bill. there was, if you will, a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as the representative point out, later on that would manifest itself in what was really an unprecedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing with the invasion to kuwait and trying to pull together a unified perspective. i think the climate -- it was not accidental. we worked awfully hard in order to maintain that. i certainly feel that the key to it was the fact that tom foley and president bush had been members of congress to gather. they had developed a personal relationship. other members of congress, including dave and others, had been there. the president was in the house -- there were personal relationships that we, frankly, in the nicest sense of the word, exploited as much as possible in order to maintain the comedy of the process. one more point, since we were commenting on him -- he was really in my opinion from at least our perspective the heart and soul of the details of this process. barry and others have talked about the importance of
engage in that follow-up if people want to help us. our community faces real civil and human rights challenges. we can face them together. host: ari ne'eman is president and co-founder of the autistic self advocacy network. it is a nonprofit organization run by and you can go to their web site at autisticadvocacy.org. >> you want to tell our viewers and listeners what to expect. we begin with a conversation einstein on thesc simpson-bowles commission. later on we will be talking about the defense capabilities section georgia at the government accountability office regarding whether it detainees at quintana mold they can be kept at one of six u.s. detention facilities on the mainland. -- at guantanamo bay and whether they can be kept at one of the six u.s. detention facilities on the mainland. this is in it. we will see you again tomorrow morning. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up today, and look back at the 1990 budget deal followed by the president of the european parliament on the eu and u.
and opportunities for all. equality before the law and civil rights. that is a psychic -- a society in which i want to live and my children to be able to live in of. there is no guarantee we will live happily ever after. the era of globalization -- we need to cooperate more than ever to defend our democracy. and our society. we cannot take what has been achieved for granted. we need to continue fighting for it on a daily basis. other parts of the world are developing. i mentioned at the beginning of my speech that in the g-20 and with its creation, it took the necessary consequence to involved in emerging regions of the world and the political system to rule the world but those parts of the world we consider today that the emerging countries are not sharing our values. the lowest salary, the lowest respect for individual rights, the los respect for freedom of speech, for example by closing the internet. it the lowest standard of what the are considering you in the united states in europe as our basic values and our standards representing our basic values. the best means to compete economically agai
region on the brink of war? >> it is boiling. what we're witnessing right now is a series of civil wars. one is completely open in syria. as you mentioned there is the issue of chemical weapons. we could talk about that quickly. in libya the militia attacked us in benghazi. you have the unsettled situation in yemen. iran which is building its own weapons system and missile and penetrating iraq. in syria i may say the issue of chemical weapons is the most serious. yes, the regime is moving weapons away from the forces of the rebels but you don't know at what time the regime may use them. you don't know when al qaeda penetrating the rebels may seize some of these rebels. it is a very tense situation in syria. melissa: just so frightening. walid phares. thanks so much for joining us. >> thank you for having me. lori: rising tensions in the middle east, oil under pressure today. fox business contributor phil flynn of price futures group following all the action from the pits of the cme. why is not oil reacting more to the news out of egypt and for that matter syria, too? >> because the mark
about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medicare, and doing some cuts there under this plan. but compare it to the white house plan, very different
syndrome. 45 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> oh, my! how ruthlessly absurd! >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall let's rock and roll. there is so much going on that every day presents another exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. get irresistibly clean and fresh carpets in your home with resolve deep clean powder. the moist powder removes three times more dirt than vacuuming alone while neutralizing odors for a clean you can see, smell and really enj
right, jill. thanks so much. jill dougherty there in brussels with the secretary. now, we are seeing new evidence today, meanwhile, of how turkey is being drawn into the civil war in neighboring syria or the potential. have a look at this. that's the view a little earlier from the turkish side of the border, as syrian war planes bombed not for the first time, the town that is literally just across the border that separates the two countries. ivan watson joining us now from istanbul, turkey. i know you have been there, and that attack obviously panicking civilians, many of whom have been crossing back and forth across the border. tell us what you have heard. >> that's right. our witnesses describing to us how the air strikes, at least two bombs dropped by syrian jets on this border town. it sent women, children, screaming in panic to the train tracks and the barbed wire fence that divides this border town in syria from the turkish town that's just about 100 yards away. it's really close and, of course, frightening people inside turkey as well. opposition activists we talked to say at leas
trafficing, women's rights, international terrorism, and more. no one nation can solve many of these problems alone. each one calls for a global network of partners -- government, businesses, international and regional organizations, academic institutions, civil society groups, even individuals, all working in concert. building those coalitions is one of the great task of american leadership. we rightly call america be indispensable nation because only the united states has the reach and resolve to rally disparate nations and peoples together to solve problems on a global scale. certainly in defense of our own interests, but also as a force for shared progress. our ability to connect is unparalleled. that, in the end, in the 21st century, is what leadership is about. diplomacy and development are not always glamorous. it is like what max weber said about politics -- the long, slow, drilling -- but it is the only way we'll be able to bring together the disparate and often conflicting interests to move forward in this interconnected world. here is one moment that captures this for me -- in dece
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13